Category Archives: critical environmental education

“Can critical pedagogy be greened?” Part 2 of the Conversation on Ecopedagogy with Rebecca Martusewicz

In Part 2 of our conversation Martusewicz moves from root metaphors and their destructive, patriarchal force. With Wendell Berry she shows us how to write a better story to create a different world. For example, she discusses her pedagogical style of having a conversation with her students about how to teach a subject (such as, math) to calculate the cost of settler colonialism. Martusewicz (and Bowers before her) critiques Freire for relying too much on these roots metaphors, with the human remaining central in his theory. She wants to be in and of the ecological as a way to critique the direction of higher education toward neoliberal capitalism (and a business model of students as consumers) and offers a way to return to values and to being caretakers of the earth.

Theme and interstitial music for Nothing Never Happens is performed by Aviva & the Flying Penguins and Lance Eric Haugan, written and arranged by Lance Eric Haugan.

Additional altro music is by Paul Myhre and Mike Shelton, “Written” (2019). Their music can be found of reverbnation.com

Ecojustice pedagogy: Part 1 of a conversation with Rebecca a. Martusewicz

Rebecca Martusewicz (pronounced: marta-savage) is Professor of Social Foundations and Community Education in the Department of Teacher Education at Eastern Michigan University. She was a founder and director of the Southeast Michigan Stewarship (SEMIS) Coalition, developing “citizen stewards of the Great Lakes.”

I spoke with Prof. Martusewicz about her new book, A Pedagogy of Responsibility: Wendell Berry for Ecojustice Education, (Routledge, 2018). She draws inspiration for ecopedagogy from the life and writings of conservationist, novelist, essayist, poet activist Berry. In her teacher education classes Martusewicz works with students on developing a cultural-ecological analysis. Berry’s writings helped in understanding the systemic causes of the contradictions in the anthropocene. Using C.A. Bower’s concept of root metaphors: emancipated individualism, a linear view of progress, and anthropocentrism, Martusewicz shows how humans are implicated in climate change and ecological destruction. Using Berry’s writings, especially his poetry and essays, she shows how to rebuild relationships back to wholeness.

Education for Global Citizenship: An Interview with Carlos Alberto Torres: Part 2:

In Part 2 Torres talks about the origins and work of the UCLA Paulo Freire Institute in social justice education. He discusses his many influences (Gramsci, Marx, liberation theology, Alves, Dussell, Habermas, Bourdieu, Illich, Rawls, Dewey, Gadotti, to name a few), and the new theoretical directions of his graduate students in ecopedagogies and anarchist pedagogies.

From his discipline of the sociology of education, Torres exposes the dilemmas of global citizenship, and the role institutions of higher education play in perpetuating the status quo. In a meeting with Freire soon before his death, Freire gave Torres a second mantra: “We have to confront neoliberalism as the new demon of our times.” Torres shares with us ways to head this call to equity, empowerment, and freedom.

Ecopedagogies: Resources

The Green Seminary Initiative: http://www.greenseminaries.org/

GreenFaith: http://www.greenfaith.org

The Center for Spirituality in Nature: http://www.centerforspiritualityinnature.org/

The Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology: http://fore.yale.edu/about-us/

Methodist School of Theology in Ohio Ecotheology Program: https://www.mtso.edu/ecotheology/

Seminary Hill Farm: https://www.seminaryhillfarm.org/

The Earth Charter: www.earthcharter.org

 Green Theory & Praxis: The Journal of Ecopedagogy: http://greentheoryandpraxisjournal.org/

 Kahn, Richard. 2010. Critical Pedagogy, Ecoliteracy, and Planetary Crisis. New York: Peter Lang.

Kearns, Laurel and Catherine Keller. 2007. Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. New York: Fordham University Press.

Sobel, David. 2004. Place-Based Education: Connecting Classrooms and Communities. Barrington, MA: Orion.

Ecopedagogies: Part 1

Prof. Laurel Kearns

Prof. Tim Van Meter

In this first of hopefully many podcasts on the topic of ecopedagogies, I am joined by Prof. Laurel Kearns of Sociology and Religion and Environmental Studies at Drew Theological School and the Graduate Division of Religion at Drew University and Prof. Tim Van Meter, Alford Chair of Christian Education and Youth Ministry and Coordinator of the Cross-Cultural Program at Methodist Theological School in Ohio. They are both part of The Green Seminary Initiative, and teach courses in religion and ecology. We discuss the roots and origins of ecological theory, environmental justice and place-based education, resilience theory, contested spaces and points of tension in environmental studies and religion, along with several main areas: food (organic farming; food justice), animals, climate change, urban vs. rural, consumption/waste, role of religious groups in environmental justice (and faith-based initiatives), links to action and pubic policy work, and imagining the future. In other words, Laurel and Tim set the larger context of ecological pedagogies for us and give offer inspiration and ideas for an eco-inclusive classroom and curriculum.